Nostalgic Homage to Homecoming Week

by: Leslie Pizzagalli

Western Connecticut State University’s Homecoming Week Street Fair held on October 7th at the Westside Campus had passersby hopping — or should we say hooping, skipping, and jumping down to The Echo’s table for a good time.

Not only was there an abundance of food trucks, booths filled with activities, and bouncy castles, but thanks to The Echo, hula hooping contests were in full swing. As far as the victors, there were some seriously nostalgic goodies to be won. Slinkies, mini paddleball, bubble wands, and Play-Doh were only a few of the addicting childhood-reminiscent handheld gadgets given out during the Street Fair event. Students, staff, friends, and family members of all ages alike were eager and excited to participate in hula hoop contests to win these 90’s inspired throwback trinkets. In addition to the youthful, colorful toys, other trinkets such as fidget spinners, gel pens, and tiny hats were also offered as grandiose rewards to be won.

Even WCSU’s mascot, Colonial Chuck, joined in on the festivities; regardless of being unable to fit into any of the three hula hoops The Echo supplied!

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With the new university semester in full swing, students are busier than ever between class time and the workload. Any and all leisure time is cherished with such packed schedules, and a break like Homecoming Week is always an enjoyable opportunity to get college goers outside and exploring what Western has to offer.

By attending the street fair, The Echo crew’s hoped that with the help of their vibrant, neon colored knickknacks and flashy prizes to bring a splash of fun color and bittersweet nostalgia to the WCSU community. Furthermore, they also intended to bring awareness to the fact that the student-run newspaper is regularly searching for writers and contributors to The Echo, as well as introducing its lively club members to their intended and potential audiences. Each person who passed by the club’s table was informed  The Echo being a student-run newspaper offered exclusively online, and that anyone would be welcome to be a part of the sixty-two years (and counting) of publications at Western Connecticut State University.

 

More Photos and Videos from The Echo’s Street Fair Table:

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The In-Cider Scoop: Apple Cider-making at Western

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By Lauren Tango

It’s that time of the year: pumpkin patches, hay rides, brisk air, and of course…apple cider! There is certainly something about this time of the year that brings communities together by enjoying traditional outdoor activities such as these. On Tuesday, October 17th, Dr. Thomas Philbrick and his Evolution & Natural History of Land Plants students hosted an event on campus demonstrating the production of apple cider.

The process is quite simple: first, the whole apples are dumped into an apple mill to be ground and collected into a cloth bag. The milled apples then head into the apple press and the cider is collected into a bucket. The apples that are used for cider are typically “rejected” apples, meaning that they were too small or misshapen to be sold in stores. At this event, there were about 600 lbs of apples used, and every member of the biology class was hands-on in the process. There was one cider press that was creating basic raw apple cider, and another press that would be heated with added spices to give the cider an extra kick. 

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Dr. Philbrick also brought a touch of history to this event by using original cider pressers from the 1800s that he had rebuilt over time. Over the last 10 years that he has been making cider, Dr. Philbrick and his wife have also hosted cider festivals at their home where the entire neighborhood is invited to come witness the process of cider-making and enjoy the finished product at the same time.

As students rushed to their classes, they could not help but stop to take a second look at what was going on due to the enticing aroma of the freshly milled apples. This was an open event for the public and students at the university, and it was definitely a hit. It was a crisp, sunny and beautiful fall day during this event: the perfect equation to enjoy a nice fresh cup of cider!

Concert Review: Western Jazz Combos Breathe New Life into Classics, Debut Original Compositions

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by Joseph Oliveri

WESTERN- With three different ensembles performing, The Veronica Hagman Concert Hall on Western’s Westside Campus could have been no better venue for Western’s inaugural Jazz Combo performance of the year on Friday, October 13th. Warmly lit, spacious, yet intimate, the simple stage setting and comforting aura was the perfect compliment to the explosive performance that showcased the immensity of the participating students’ tastes and improvisational proficiency.

The first ensemble, coached by jazz instructor Peter Tomlison, boasted the scatting abilities of vocalist Sarah Sacala’s bouncy scatting on bandmate Bentley Lewis’s (guitar) original composition “Limonata,” a tune with an arpeggiated motif that I still can’t seem to get out of my head. Following was a sultry cover of the standard “Darn that Dream.” With horns and rhythm section layered seamlessly, I was sure I could have heard Sacala’s smile in the lyrics had I closed my eyes, answered by baritone sax, tenor sax, and trumpet solos by Matt Schmidt, Nick Kallajian, and Austin Schmidt, respectively, with particular credit to Austin Schmidt’s whirling diminished lines. The Tomlison set closed with bassist member Niles’s Spaulding’s composition, with the tongue-in-cheek title,“Combros,” a lumbering bossa-nova that shifted to a bluesy, one-chord vamp that all soloists, particularly guitarists Bentley Lewis and Brian Suto, lavished over.

Following was instructor Jeff Siegel’s combo. While vocals were absent from this set, the intensity of the solos made up for it: the double guitar partnership rivaled the Tomilson group’s, breaking in with a crisp version of the jazz composer Johnny Mercer’s “Tangerine.” Second was another Mercer composition, “Emily,” preluded by a duo chordal interplay between guitarists Gianni Gardner and Tom Polizzi who seemed to practically converse with each other through the voices of their axes. Last was “Nimmo,” a ferocious instrumental that drove the guitarists, as well as Austin Iesu on trumpet and Malin Carta on alto sax, into fierce solos that married blues subtleties with avant-garde chaos. For this set, though, the title of show-stealer undoubtedly went to drummer Niles Spaulding, whose long solo on “Nimmo,” drew a few audience members to their feet at the applause.

Lastly, instructor Lee Metcalf’s combo greeted us with a scat version Nat King Cole’s “That’s What,” courtesy of perfectly-synchronized harmonizing between vocalist Samantha Feliciano and guitarist Chris Cochrane. A refreshing new addition of piano, courtesy of Joe Conticello, was introduced to us, and despite having a richer rhythm section, the Metcalf combo carried Feliciano’s voice perfectly, especially on the following number, “Isn’t it a Pity We’ve Never Met Before.” The hugely energetic Miles Livolsi stood out on bass, drawing more than a few smiles from the audience with his lines on the closer “Punjab,” which was marked by the show’s dramatic zenith; a strong-timbre solo from tenor saxophonist Nathan Edwards.

The three ensembles came and left the stage all too quickly; I doubt I was alone in wondering how how nine songs had just devoured the past two hours. If anything, I can only hope the WCSU jazz students’ professional-grade affinity for hot licks and sweet tones are no longer a secret.

Westconn Dominates & Stirs School Spirit at Homecoming Game

By Lawrence Perry

The WCSU Homecoming game was surprisingly packed. The stadium was filled with supporters yelling like madmen and women. Maybe this is why our home team played so well. Playing against Worcester State, Westconn put up a very good performance.

The first thing of note was a tackle by Mike Quinn. It was still early; the teams were still feeling each other out. After a few minutes of gridlock, Westconn kicked the ball, and Chris Shizaar caught it. Worchester tried to come back, but couldn’t make any traction.

The game started at 6pm. 39 minutes later, Worchester had only scored 3 points. Westconn, meanwhile, already had 14 points. This set the tone for the rest of the night. After a few more plays that went nowhere, including an impressive tackle, the first period ended.

By period two, the crowd was getting into the game. They chanted “Defense!” and “WCSU!” At one point, the score went up to Westconn 35, Worchester 10. A supporter chanted: “Let’s go baby! I see you!”

The rest of the game was a blowout. Though Worchester made some good plays, which earned them 23 points, Westconn won with 49 points.

It was a fun game that even a non-football fan could enjoy. If the goal was to fill students with school spirit, the game succeeded.